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Welcome to the UEIL

Led by Prof. Elisa Konofagou, the Ultrasound Elasticity and Imaging Laboratory works on developing novel, ultrasound-based techniques for both imaging and therapeutic applications. Some of the ongoing research in the UEIL includes:

  • Enabling targeted drug delivery to the brain by opening the blood-brain barrier with focused ultrasound.

  • Mapping the mechanical and electromechanical properties of the heart using myocardial elastography and electromechanical wave imaging.

  • Monitoring High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation therapy with harmonic motion imaging.

  • Using pulse wave imaging to quantify the stiffness of the arterial wall and assess the likelihood of an aneurysm rupturing.

  • Modulating neural activity in the central and peripheral nervous system through high-intensity focused ultrasound.

The UEIL is located in the Columbia University Medical Center at the New York Presbyterian Hospital and is part of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Columbia University. If you have any additional inquiries, or if you would be interested in collaborating with our laboratory, please feel free to contact us.

Latest News

September 02, 2021

Antonios Pouliopoulos featured in Columbia's BME Blaze

UEIL Associate Researcher Antonios Pouliopoulos was interviewed by Columbia BME about his research projects in the lab, his high school student mentorship work, and his future plans in academia. Antonios has been an invaluable member of the lab for several years, and he will be soon starting a new role as an assistant professor at King's College London. Congratulations Antonios on the well-deserved professorship; we miss you already!

Read the full interview here

August 31, 2021

Katherine Liu wins third place in DEBUT Challenge 2021

UEIL Lab member Katherine Liu has won an impressive third place at DEBUT Challenge, which is a national NIH competition for undergraduate projects. Liu worked in a team that developed an EyePhone, which is a phone app to monitor the progress of glaucoma. EyePhone works in coordination with a cardboard VR headset to create a virtual reality field for at-home visual field testing. The device uses existing visual field-testing algorithms to assess a person’s vision outside of a doctor’s office, promoting more regular and accessible monitoring of glaucoma progression.